Last updated: August 27. 2013 5:44PM - 143 Views

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Heber Hunt Elementary School students learned a little about art, a little about language and a little about diversity during a field trip Friday to the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art.



Their tour of the museum’s exhibit of works by Richard Deon, incorporated a lesson in different languages.



Community volunteer Alecia Farkas, Heber Hunt English as a second language teacher Susan Edwards and Museum Coordinator Vicki Weaver held up cards with words in Russian, Spanish and English to talk about the different concepts during the tour. Deon’s artwork relies heavily on what Weaver called a visual language, with repeated images and symbols.



Students talked about different symbols they encounter every day, such as computer icons, stop signs and brand logos, then tried to interpret Deon’s symbols.



Students had fun spotting the repeated elements, such as an outline inspired by the plastic top of a disposable razor, a man with a pointer and chevrons, among others.



“I thought it was really interesting, because there were a lot of images put into other images,” said 10-year-old Magie Norton, a fourth-grader.



Deon’s paintings incorporate different repeated images, similar to a collage.



Norton liked a figure with two feet, a drape and one hand that appeared in many of Deon’s paintings.



“Some of the things were hard to notice,” said fourth-grader Brooke Walker, 10.



Students were also asked to pronounce the words for some of the things they learned about in the other languages.



“It was kind of fun learning the new words in the different languages,” Brooke said.



Weaver said the idea behind presenting the words, such as “artist,” “vocabulary,” “image” and “repetition” in the different languages spoken in the community is to start a conversation about language and diversity.



Weaver said she also tried to encourage students to look more closely at the artwork and offer their own interpretations of what the symbols meant.



“It empowers the children’s deeper thinking, critical thinking, higher-level thinking,” she said.



The exhibit runs through June 7.


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